Buy My Book!

Love the blog? Now get it in handy book form–only $11.40!  Available for pre-order now–comes out August 4! Buy it at all these places! It also makes a great gift for all those struggling grad students in your life! For … Continue reading

I Don’t Know You

In last week’s Job Offer Digest, one of my successful clients wrote this: “Still, don’t kid yourself; working with Dr. Karen is hard! It forces you to take a long hard look at yourself, your work, and your presentation of … Continue reading

How to Apply for a Dean Position (A Guest Post in the form of an interview)

The writer of this post is dean at a public liberal-arts-and-science college in the Midwest. S/he has spent a career in public higher education at comprehensive and baccalaureate campuses in a number of instructional and administrative roles. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Karen:  Sketch … Continue reading

The Job Offer Digest

Those of you who follow me on Facebook know that last week a little debate arose there about whether it was good to anonymously post all the job (and postdoc) offers received by my clients, or if that practice had … Continue reading

Americans Don’t Brag

Americans don’t brag.  That’s not true; Americans brag all the time, about many things–money, sex,  the fish that got away.  However, we don’t brag as much as you’d expect in our job applications.  This may seem counterintuitive, considering the global … Continue reading

“I Plan to Take Full Advantage of My Acquired Skills!”

A line from a letter last week: “In my own lab I plan to take full advantage of my acquired skills and use the XXX equipment  to further investigate xxxx.” This kind of language is braggy and at the same … Continue reading

Don’t State the Obvious

 There is a kind of line in job documents that is technically blameless, but is so generic, so very much “stating the obvious” that it also completely pointless.  This kind of line fills space while doing nothing to distinguish you … Continue reading

Four Tips for Getting Hired at a Christian University (A Guest Post)

Today’s anonymous author is a tenured professor in the field of religion at a mid-sized Christian University. He has sat on and chaired numerous search committees for both faculty and administrative hires. He sees the enormous stack of applicants for … Continue reading

The Teaching-Centric Letter

In response to many requests, I am devoting today’s post to the teaching-centric letter.  The absence of a post on this subject before now might seem surprising on a blog that purports to cover every aspect of the academic job … Continue reading

Adjectives Are Not Arguments, Part I

It is time that all of you grasped a simple yet profound truth of academic writing: adjectives are not arguments. Simply repeating the words: complex multivalent/multidirectional/multiplicitous unique diasporic transnational intersectional over and over in your documents, does not suggest that … Continue reading