“I Plan to Take Full Advantage of My Acquired Skills!”

A line from a letter last week: “In my own lab I plan to take full advantage of my acquired skills and use the XXX equipment  to further investigate xxxx.” This kind of language is braggy and at the same … Continue reading

Don’t State the Obvious

 There is a kind of line in job documents that is technically blameless, but is so generic, so very much “stating the obvious” that it also completely pointless.  This kind of line fills space while doing nothing to distinguish you … Continue reading

The Status of the Press Matters, Still!

A debate has simmered on the comment thread to my post, Does the Status of the Press Matter, in recent weeks, on the question: is Palgrave MacMillan a press with high enough status for a US R1 tenure case?  My … Continue reading

Four Tips for Getting Hired at a Christian University (A Guest Post)

Today’s anonymous author is a tenured professor in the field of religion at a mid-sized Christian University. He has sat on and chaired numerous search committees for both faculty and administrative hires. He sees the enormous stack of applicants for … Continue reading

My Book Is On Amazon!

My book, The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. Into a Job, is available for pre-order from Amazon and Barnes and Noble!  Pre-order price ~ $13.00 (paperback), $10.00 (Kindle or Nook). For bulk orders for use … Continue reading

The Teaching-Centric Letter

In response to many requests, I am devoting today’s post to the teaching-centric letter.  The absence of a post on this subject before now might seem surprising on a blog that purports to cover every aspect of the academic job … Continue reading

An Inconvenient Truth (A Guest Post)

A reader got in touch to tell me about an infuriating experience at a recent conference. I asked her to write it up as a guest post, and here it is. Professors: stop the madness. Tell graduate students the goddamned … Continue reading

Adjectives Are Not Arguments, Part I

It is time that all of you grasped a simple yet profound truth of academic writing: adjectives are not arguments. Simply repeating the words: complex multivalent/multidirectional/multiplicitous unique diasporic transnational intersectional over and over in your documents, does not suggest that … Continue reading