Buy My Book!

Love the blog? Now get it in handy book form–only $11.40!  Available for pre-order now–comes out August 4! Buy it at all these places! It also makes a great gift for all those struggling grad students in your life! For … Continue reading

I Don’t Know You

In last week’s Job Offer Digest, one of my successful clients wrote this: “Still, don’t kid yourself; working with Dr. Karen is hard! It forces you to take a long hard look at yourself, your work, and your presentation of … Continue reading

“I Plan to Take Full Advantage of My Acquired Skills!”

A line from a letter last week: “In my own lab I plan to take full advantage of my acquired skills and use the XXX equipment  to further investigate xxxx.” This kind of language is braggy and at the same … Continue reading

Dr. Karen’s (Partial) Rules for the Artist’s Statement

It may surprise you to hear that I edit Artist Statements, but I do.  Not a ton, but enough that this post has become necessary.  I want to urge everyone to read this excellent post on the subject by Ben … Continue reading

Don’t State the Obvious

 There is a kind of line in job documents that is technically blameless, but is so generic, so very much “stating the obvious” that it also completely pointless.  This kind of line fills space while doing nothing to distinguish you … Continue reading

The Job of an Academic Editor: Part 1 (Fruscione #Postac Post)

by Joseph Fruscione I’ve written previously about the life of an academic editor.  In previous installments, I wrote about developmental and STEM editing opportunities. With a hat-tip to Jo VanEvery for the suggestion, I’m focusing today on editing academics’ work, … Continue reading

The Teaching-Centric Letter

In response to many requests, I am devoting today’s post to the teaching-centric letter.  The absence of a post on this subject before now might seem surprising on a blog that purports to cover every aspect of the academic job … Continue reading

Adjectives Are Not Arguments, Part I

It is time that all of you grasped a simple yet profound truth of academic writing: adjectives are not arguments. Simply repeating the words: complex multivalent/multidirectional/multiplicitous unique diasporic transnational intersectional over and over in your documents, does not suggest that … Continue reading

Stop Acting Like a Grad Student, Redux: “After My Defense, I Will…”

I am always telling clients to stop “sounding like a grad student.”  But the trouble is, clients don’t understand all the ways that they do this. Some are obvious.  “While a grad student in the English Ph.D. program, I…..”  is … Continue reading