Of Cover Letters and Magic (A Follow-up Post)

There is some advice I give that I believe in fiercely and will defend to the death (ref: Should I Do an Edited Collection?). And then there is some advice I give that I am very willing to concede may … Continue reading

How To Write a Journal Article Submission Cover Letter

Today’s post is a special request post for several clients who have written to inquire how to write a cover letter for the submission of an article manuscript to a journal. ****Addendum (4/29/13):  Please read the follow up to this … Continue reading

Nobody Cares What You’re Interested In

One very common error that writers of job documents make is going on and on about what they are interested in. It’s often quite a writing tic. “I am interested in…. and I am particularly interested in…and a topic of … Continue reading

Gerund Addiction and Word Repetition–Two More Scourges

Faithful readers know that I have several posts on different kinds of writing tics that plague many academic writers.  These include list addiction, dyad addiction, and cheap adjectives. There are two more writing tics that I’ve come to identify: gerund … Continue reading

The Weepy Teaching Statement: Just Say No

An expanded and updated version of this post can now be found in Chapter  25 of my new book, The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. Into a Job. I am keeping a shortened version here, … Continue reading

How and Why to Write Collaboratively: A Guest Post

For the next bit of time I will be posting special guest posts early in the week, in addition to my regular Friday post.  These guest posts are kindly submitted by readers in response to requests that arise on the … Continue reading

List Addiction, Cont’d: The Dyad

List addiction is an epidemic among academic writers. I have a blog post about the subject (which I knew nothing about prior to my work in TPII), and I refer at least 50% of clients to that blog post at … Continue reading

Banish These Words

Do not use the words “unique” or “burgeoning” in any of your job documents. They are painfully overused. The first is just trite. The second is over-dramatic.   That is all. … Continue reading