How to Turn Your Teaching Duds into Memorable Statements

Sharing another post in our new semi-regular series, “Missives from the Editing Trenches” written by long-time TPII editors. They are the real MVPs, working in the trenches to catch you in all your job document pitfalls — from the self-deprecating … Continue reading

Another Teaching Statement Cliché: The Messiah- Narrative

Today we are launching a new semi-regular series, “Missives from the Editing Trenches” written by long-time TPII editors. They are the real MVPs, working in the trenches to catch you in all your job document pitfalls — from the self-deprecating … Continue reading

The Job Search is Not a Striptease

One of my pet peeves in job documents is when the job candidate coyly gestures toward a research conclusion, without actually coming out and saying what the conclusion is. I have no idea why so many job seekers are so … Continue reading

Dr. Karen’s Rules of the Research Statement

For the Fall 2016 Job Market I am re-posting the essential job application posts.  We’ve looked at the Cover Letter and the CV  and the Teaching Statement.  Today we look at the Research Statement. An expanded and updated version of … Continue reading

Update on My Book: Blurbs, Reviews, and a Promotion

The book inches closer to actually existing in the material world (August 4)!  It has gotten some lovely blurbs by amazing people, like this one by the inimitable Rebecca Schuman: “If you would like your academic career to begin in … Continue reading

Buy My Book!

Love the blog? Now get it in handy book form–only $11.40!  Available for pre-order now–comes out August 4! Buy it at all these places! It also makes a great gift for all those struggling grad students in your life! For … Continue reading

Dr. Karen’s (Partial) Rules for the Artist’s Statement

It may surprise you to hear that I edit Artist Statements, but I do.  Not a ton, but enough that this post has become necessary.  I want to urge everyone to read this excellent post on the subject by Ben … Continue reading

Adjectives Are Not Arguments, Part I

It is time that all of you grasped a simple yet profound truth of academic writing: adjectives are not arguments. Simply repeating the words: complex multivalent/multidirectional/multiplicitous unique diasporic transnational intersectional over and over in your documents, does not suggest that … Continue reading

Break The Cycle of List-Addiction (Or, Just Say No To Flabby Logic)

[This is a repost] Too many of you are addicted to lists in your writing. What does this look like? Well, something like this: “In sum, my dissertation uses interviews, surveys, textual analysis, and internet research in order to explore … Continue reading